Did Jesus PROHIBIT women - NCR Discussion

Did Jesus PROHIBIT women


Did Jesus PROHIBIT women priests and bishops by "not choosing" women, or by "not including" women to be apostles? And if so, did Jesus PROHIBIT women priests and bishops for ALL times and in ALL places?
Not everyone so thinks, or believes, including many current members of the Roman church, some of whom are priests and bishops. These brave and intrepid believers know that if they must be considered "disobedient," it should rather be to the pope and his curia rather than to Jesus and God.
The evidence for a prohibition by Jesus is weak and underwhelming, even if it can be said to exist at all. This leaves "tradition," such as it is, and the voice of current Roman church authority, all male and thoroughly clerical, as "the voice of God."
Could all this change with the election of a new pope? And if not the next pope, how about the one after the next one? [By that time, will change by or from the Vatican make any difference?]


There is simply no

There is simply no theological argument that holds any weight, showing why women can't be priests. It's all about misogyny and misinformation. Women need to be ordained to all offices of the Church, including that of Bishop of Rome. This must and I'm sure eventually will happen.

By following this path McLain

By following this path McLain a former nun, who apparently broke her vows and married outside the Church, has now sought to become a priestess, and she is perfectly free to do so. This is all about personal choice and faith. But although this exercise mimics the Catholic Sacrament of Ordination, complete with vestments and staff, the cold hard reality is that it is little more than play acting. Here is hoping that "Father McLain" will soon have a turn of heart and return home in humility and holy obedience.

Um, I don't recall seeing the

Um, I don't recall seeing the word 'priestess' in the article.

On another website I see a

On another website I see a statement by the bishop Coyne, where it is written:
"She cannot be a priest in a church that has not called her to that priesthood."
And I always was convinced that it is God himself that calls a person to priesthood, not any Church... It's everything about power and not a real God's will.
If you want to read it yourselves, check the link: http://www.catholic.org/national/national_story.php?id=45782
It's on the second page. Saying truth, I haven't seen so much arrogance and disdain like in this statement for a long time.

According to theologian

According to theologian Joseph Komonchak, it has historically been *the Church* that has called to presbyteral ordination. For more info on this and related that he addresses, please see his blogging comments at http://www.commonwealmagazine.org/blog/?p=15131#comments; title of thread is "Irish bishop calls for optional celibacy".
On the other hand, Bishop Coyne undercuts his argument when he acknowledges --- rightly --- that it is the Church that calls people to ordination.
Vatican II taught us that the Church is the People of God, i.e., all of us, male and female, ordained and lay.
The Church, i.e., the People of God, is calling women to ordained ministry in the presbyterate and episcopate.
Bishop Coyne is correct with his history --- but wrong with his conclusion!

At his Holy Thursday chrism

At his Holy Thursday chrism Mass at the Vatican, Pope Benedict XVI reaffirmed the church's ban on women priests, asking: "Is disobedience a path of renewal for the church?"
Yes.

The pope has said,

The pope has said, definitively so,
women as priests, the answer is no.
Jesus was a man and male must you be,
even mother mary, no priest was she.
Now all that is changed forevermore,
science holds a key and opens a door.
With the egg and the sperm conception arrives,
for the first 40 days we are females, even the guys.
Truth it seems is stranger than fiction,
one little thing the gospels don't mention.
in the beginning, for a few days time,
the Daughter of God was Jesus sublime.

There has been no major

There has been no major study that I know of of the subject of women's ordination in the Catholic Church since no one has clarified whether it is a cultural question, a theological question, or a Biblical question. The only study that has been made of the issue is one by Krister Stendahl, a Lutheran Biblical scholar and Bishop, who headed the Harvard Divinity School for a number of years.
His study "The Bible and the Role of Women", published by Fortress Press in 1966, came after the Swedish government had mandated women "prasts" for the Church of Sweden. His arguments are Biblical and he sees the question as part of the growing role of women in human society and a matter of justice. 25 years later, his wife made a study of how womoen "prasts" were accepted in the Swedish Church and found that it had not really succeeded. The older male pastors and many parishioners would not accept it.
From the Catholic side, an opinion has been expressed by Sister Giotto Moots of San Ysidro, New Mexico, and she opposed it on Anthropological grounds, from the very nature of men and women. The Catholic Church opposes it on Biblical and theological grounds, a matter of Divine Revelation: such ordinations would be invalid, just as the authority of the Church opposes the use of anything other than bread and wine for a valid Eucharist.
But no major study has been made by anyone even though a spate of articles have been written airing the subject. I imagine the question will be with us for a long time.
Father Clifford Stevens
Boys Town, Nebraska

See Kenan Osborne's

See Kenan Osborne's PRIESTHOOD: A HISTORY OF THE ORDAINED MINISTRY IN THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH (http://www.amazon.com/Priesthood-History-Ordained-Ministry-Catholic/dp/1...).
Biographical information is at http://www.fst.edu/pdf_fst/osborne_CURRENT_CV.pdf.
I also recommend Robert Egan's "Why Not? Scripture, History & Women's Ordination" at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1252/is_7_135/ai_n29481721/.

There has been no major

There has been no major study that I know of of the subject of women's ordination in the Catholic Church since no one has clarified whether it is a cultural question, a theological question, or a Biblical question. The only study that has been made of the issue is one by Krister Stendahl, a Lutheran Biblical scholar and Bishop, who headed the Harvard Divinity School for a number of years.
His study "The Bible and the Role of Women", published by Fortress Press in 1966, came after the Swedish government had mandated women "prasts" for the Church of Sweden. His arguments are Biblical and he sees the question as part of the growing role of women in human society and a matter of justice. 25 years later, his wife made a study of how womoen "prasts" were accepted in the Swedish Church and found that it had not really succeeded. The older male pastors and many parishioners would not accept it.
From the Catholic side, an opinion has been expressed by Sister Giotto Moots of San Ysidro, New Mexico, and she opposed it on Anthropological grounds, from the very nature of men and women. The Catholic Church opposes it on Biblical and theological grounds, a matter of Divine Revelation: such ordinations would be invalid, just as the authority of the Church opposes the use of anything other than bread and wine for a valid Eucharist.
But no major study has been made by anyone even though a spate of articles have been written airing the subject. I imagine the question will be with us for a long time.
Father Clifford Stevens
Boys Town, Nebraska